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Ansel Adams? No, Innovative Automation in Houston.

Posted March 31, 2020 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Uncategorized

trainjumper

This photo seems to depict a romantic tale of Depression-era rail riding, when migrating workers known as Hobos rode the rails following the crop harvest southward. Coffee and vittles at dusk -- with maybe a homemade pie from a local sympathizer -- were the end to many nights for the vagabonds of the 1930s.

In fact, this is Stephen Weatherley, Innovative's Houston sales manager, climbing over a train to get to his next appointment on Monday.

Photo was taken not by Ansel Adams, but by Nick Roeder, Innovative sales pro who already had made the climb.

We stop at nothing to get to our appointments on time. -- PH

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How Does One Pronounce Wittenstein?

Posted March 25, 2020 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Blog, Uncategorized

wittensteinsteinEver since Alpha gears changed its name to Wittenstein, Texas regional sales engineer Chuck Carr our staff has been biting his nails grappling with how to pronounce the name.

Is it Witten-steen? Or is it Witten-styne?

Wittenstein's Miriam Metcalf said that "it depends on what country you live in." Well, we live in a country called Texas, but we still don't know.

Metcalf provided the answer. Just remember this photo (above), she wrote in an email. Lessee now, that's a beer stein, right?

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Omron PLC Training Tulsa – March 10-11

Posted February 11, 2020 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Uncategorized

Two-day class on basic and intermediate PLC.

Plus you'll leave with $230+ worth of hard equipment, including a leather engineer's bag. This is a HOT class -- Hands On Training -- that will add value to your skill set. Invest in yourself and your career with training from Innovative-IDM.

$449 for both days. Email info@iidm.com to reserve your spot. Class limited to 12 seats. Laptop required. Hearty lunch included.

 

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Most Industrial Accidents Are Avoidable. Not This One.

Posted November 10, 2019 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Blog, Uncategorized

While most industrial accidents can be avoided through the proper use of safety procedures and equipment safeguards, the one that happened 44 years ago today couldn't.

The SS Edmund Fitzgerald was an American Great Lakes freighter that made headlines after sinking in a Lake Superior storm on November 10, 1975, with the loss of the entire crew of 29.

With Captain Ernest M. McSorley in command and carrying a full cargo of taconite ore pellets, the Fitzgerald embarked on her final voyage from Superior, Wisconsin, on the afternoon of November 9, 1975.

En route to a steel mill near Detroit, Michigan, she joined a second freighter, the SS Arthur M. Anderson. By the next day the two ships were caught in the midst of a massive winter storm, with near hurricane-force winds and waves up to 35 feet (11 m) high.

Shortly after 7:10 p.m. the Fitzgerald suddenly sank in Canadian waters approximately 17 miles from the entrance to Whitefish Bay, at a depth of 530 feet. Although the Fitzgerald had reported being in difficulty earlier, no distress signals were sent before she sank. Her crew of 29 perished and no bodies were recovered.

source: Wikipedia

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