Monthly Archives: October 2019

Tough Mudder 2019 (vid, 2 min)

Posted October 18, 2019 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: IIDM Behind the Scenes

Earlier this month, some of our DFW team met on a hot Saturday morning to slosh around in the mud. If they do it again in 2020, as they did in 2018, we might call Tough Mudder a DFW IIDM "tradition."

Read More

How Do I Retrofit a DC Drive to AC Drive

Posted October 16, 2019 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Blog

Visit Innovative-IDM's knowledge center at: https://www.innovativeidm.com/Resources.aspx

For more information Yaskawa Drives and VFDs visit: https://www.innovativeidm.com/manufacturer/yaskawa-vfd/ and https://www.innovativeidm.com/manufacturer/yaskawa_motion/

Hi, I’m Adam Ring with Innovative-IDM. The other day I was having lunch and somebody asked me "how do you go about converting from a DC drive system to an AC drive system?" I thought it might be a good idea to make a quick video. Other people might have that same question.

So there’s a few things you want to take a look at. Number one is what’s the speed that your DC motor is running at? Another thing you want to look at is what is the amount of torque that your application requires? Based on those two pieces of information, you can go back and calculate how much horsepower that you need, and then make sure that you replace your DC with an equivalent AC motor and drive that are going to give you at least that amount of speed, at least that amount of torque. And one of the cool things that happens when you actually switch from a DC to an AC is with a DC you get constant torque throughout the speed range. And that’s one of the reasons a lot of people apply them is because when you are going really slow you can get a fairly constant torque, all the way up to your max speed.

With AC drive technology today, with a closed look flux vector, you actually get the same kind of performance, all the way down to zero speed. You can have 100% of your motors torque down to zero speed. As far as solving the applications, it’s going to be able to respond very quickly, give you the full torque across the entire speed range, and it’s actually more efficient because of the way that the design works. So you actually at the end of the day get to save some of your current that’s required to do a similar application, which basically translates into cost savings for power.

So if you would like to learn more about how to convert your applications from DC to AC, please visit our knowledge center at Innovativeidm.com. After all, we are the home of the legendary customer experience.

Read More

Yaskawa Application Overview: Rotary Knife

Posted October 9, 2019 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Blog

Click here for the full "Application Overview: Rotary Knife" from Yaskawa.

The rotary knife is a common application in the packaging industry where many products are packaged using a seal-and-cut technique. Packaging is fed from a continuous roll and is formed into a tube around the product and the package is then sealed and cut by a rotating knife. Rotary knives are also used in other applications where the process involves matching speed with a conveyor mechanism at consistent product spacing, such as stamping a package.

A sensor reads small marks on the package (called “registration marks”) that determine where the knife is to make its cut. It is almost always important in a rotary cam application that the knife-speed matches the line-speed during the cut. This is defined as the cut region and is consistent on each cycle. The built-in linear cam shifting and linear interpolation of the controller handle all required adjustments. By utilizing the camming function of the Yaskawa controllers, accurate and smooth mechanics can be achieved. Zero drift occurs over time because registration is used on each product, guaranteeing consistent cut lengths each cycle.

Call Innovative-IDM at 877.906.2100 or send us an email at info@iidm.com for all of your Yaskawa product needs. Innovative-IDM is your #1 Yaskawa supplier.

Read More

How to Control High Voltage Spikes

Posted October 2, 2019 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Blog

Hi, my name is Andy Lewis with Innovative IDM. A lot of the times when I'm out in the industrial sector, I find a lot of my customers have problems with transients aka surges, sags, or swells. Generally, what occurs here is due to your utility company who provides a power factor correction.

Now this can be done in a variety of ways. Switching due to time, temperature, or it could be fixed based upon certain times of the day or temperature once again. Whenever this occurs, this actually sends a spike throughout your electrical circuit through your service entrance down to your intermediary bus duct and right into your machines.

What does this cause? Parameter failure and/or loss, PLC reset, and down time due to machines having to be restarted. This causes a lot of problems for production, lots of money, lots of time, and headache.

There's a couple of ways you can fix it actually. At the service entrance, you can actually use a MOV and selenium stack transient suppression unit. What this does is the MOV's will take on the instantaneous voltage spike, but it can't handle it for too long because they're self sacrificing.

What will happen then is there's a handshake from the MOV's (metal oxide varistors) to the selenium stack, which will handle the brute force of the transient. After that, you could actually have surge protection in an intermediary way at the bus duct, which will include once again the MOV's and the selenium stack, but once again not in as large of a size.

Finally, at point of use you could actually use MOV's to help protect the machine from anything that's come down stream already.

If you'd like more information on this please contact us at https://www.innovativeidm.com/ and remember Innovative IDM is the home of the legendary customer experience.

Read More