Industrial AC Drive

Industrial AC Drive Start Up Tips

Posted November 2, 2017 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: AC Drives, Blog, Industrial AC Drive, Industrial Electronics Repair

If you need help with your AC drive start up, call us. We can help.

Here are some tips to help you with an industrial AC drive start up.

Before You Start

• VFDs are mounted in an appropriate environment and required input circuit protection.
• Install all electrical conduit, if needed, prior to the AC drive start up
• The electrical in/out 3Ø power cable have been pulled and are terminated onto VFDs.
• The AC motors are mounted and are uncoupled from the load, if possible, to facilitate an auto tune of the VFD with access to the motor name plate data.
• The communication signals are pulled and are near the field connection terminals on the VFD.

AC Drive Start Up Steps

• Verify the drive model number to ensure it's the correct model
• Ensure the area surrounding the drive complies with specifications
• Verify that the drive is properly sized to run the motor
• Confirm there is proper circuit protection as specified by national and local code
• Properly wire drive terminals R/L1, S/L2, T/L3 & R/T1. V/T2, W/T3 and control wiring
• Properly ground the drive and tighten control and grounding terminal according to specification
• Program the VFD according to the motor nameplate data and customer’s expectations
• Perform Auto-Tune based on control mode and other operating conditions.
• Verify rotation.

Innovative-IDM is an Authorized Service Provider and Distributor for Yaskawa VFDs. When we do your Yaskawa AC drive start up, you receive an additional year on your Yaskawa factory warranty -- a total of two years.

Silva

If you have a drive that needs to be repaired, we can help you with that, too. If I can be of any help to you, email me and I'd be glad to walk you through whatever I can. If you're not using VFDs, you could end up like Lucy in the candy factory.

Juan Silva is a field service technician out of our Houston store. You can reach him at juan.silva@iidm.com.

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Yaskawa A1000 Features and Benefits: Video

Posted January 28, 2017 by eeadmin

Categories: Blog, Industrial AC Drive

Yaskawa is the world’s largest manufacturer of AC inverter drives and related products for controlling motion of AC induction motors from fractional to 1750 HP. Yaskawa has earned the reputation for having the most reliable, most technically advanced, and longest-lasting products.

Innovative-IDM has helped clients with Yaskawa drives for 15 years. We can help you, too. Here are some features and benefits of the A1000 VFD.

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Industrial Drive Repair: Replace or Repair?

Posted February 19, 2016 by Pepper Hastings

Categories: Blog, Electronics Repair, Industrial AC Drive, Industrial Electronics Repair

Tags: ,

Industrial drive repair is an important discussion point in most manufacturing facilities. Often, the discussion is whether it’s worth repairing a VFD. Or just buy a new one.

Industrial Drive Repair

Industrial drive repair can be a tricky decision. When should you repair vs. when should you go ahead and replace the VFD? Read more to find out.

VFDs (Variable Frequency Drives) have decreased in price over the years. And with standard VFDs, it’s often economical to replace rather than repair the VFD. A reputable VFD repair company will tell you up front when a drive just isn’t worth repairing.

Many VFDs ARE worthy of repair. Here are some examples where repairing and AC drive might be preferable to replacing it.

When Industrial Drive Repair Makes Sense

It’s a specialized VFD. Some plants have machines worth millions of dollars that have small, very specialized VFDs. Due to communication bus issues, spacing issues (or other application specific reasons) it’s just not feasible to replace them. Innovative-IDM and other reputable repair depots can repair these specialized VFDs and keep the machine running.

It’s a large horsepower unit. The larger the HP, the more likely it is that repairing the VFD is a better option than replacement. For one thing, the installation costs alone on a large HP VFD can be significant, often exceeding the repair costs. We see significant numbers of high horsepower VFD repairs at our repair shop.

Servos. Servo drives are, in general, expensive. They also tend to have application specific software and communication protocols and are often great candidates for repair.

There are large numbers of the specific VFD in the facility. Once you have spares, your maintenance personnel have experience on the units. Now you can use a drive repair company for backup; it might make more sense to stay with what you have and just repair the VFD s rather than replace with new.

We have many customers in this situation. They weigh the cost of the VFD repair, against the TOTAL cost of replacement, which includes things like spares, personnel training, etc.

So, what goes wrong with VFDs?

In general, VFDs are quite reliable. But like any piece of machinery, they have common break points that cause problems, such as:

Loose connections. Don’t laugh, it’s a major cause of VFD downtime. Check simple stuff first. Is a plug on the main circuit board loose? Check your connections before trying a more complex VFD repair.

Cooling Fans. Major cause of problems in industrial drive repair. Some VFD s will let you know about this, but most won’t until you begin tripping on over temperature. The overheating can, and almost certainly will, cause major issues long term. Check your fans often.

Electrolytic Capacitors. These have relatively short lives compared to other components. Overheating shortens it even more.

Power Semiconductors. These are less common, but drastic failures. If this happens, do NOT just replace the IGBT or Diode, find out why if failed. Or, you’ll likely just be replacing it again as soon as you power up.

VFD Software or programming. Was it running before you tried changing a parameter? Then put it all back to where it was and see if that fixes it. Don’t automatically install factory suggested software revisions until you back up what’s running. In general, if it’s running fine now, leave the programming alone.

Circuit boards. These are much less common industrial drive repair failure than one might think, but is often the first thing suspected when an inexperienced technician begins to repair a VFD.

MarcCropwBackground

Phelps

We give firm VFD repair quotes at IIDM and provide free evaluations in our shop. Email me and I’d be happy to discuss your individual situation, or pass you along to one of our technicians for further discussion about whether it’s worth repairing your variable frequency drive, or replacing it with a new one. BTW, did you know that IDM stands for Industrial Drive Maintenance? Isn’t that the kind of repair company you want for your industrial drive repairs?

Marc Phelps is manager of the Innovative-IDM repair facility in Houston. You can contact him at marc.phelps@iidm.com

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Yaskawa F7 Drive: Problem I’ve Never Seen

Posted August 26, 2015 by eeadmin

Categories: Blog, Industrial AC Drive

As one of Innovative-IDM's Houston-area field service technicians, I was called out to look at a lathe.

The customer complained that the lube pump wasn't working. It actually was. But we started the machine and ramped it up, it sounded like the gears were going to grind out of the machine and the DB resistors started smoking. The customer indicated it was probably normal, due to low load and gear selection...I took the opposite view (there is something seriously wrong here) and convinced him to pull the belts. The motor continued to cog (and the DB started to smoke again) at about 1/4 speed even uncoupled.

The motor megged and ohmed normal.

The Yaskawa F7 4045 drive was running in Open loop vector.

I disconnected the DB Unit (it statically checked fine). The cogging continued and the drive OV tripped.

I saved the parameters and switched the drive to V/Hz. The cogging decreased dramatically (however the machine still started to vibrate. No OV trip.) The output waveform looked fairly normal phase to phase, and normal phase to+/- busses.

At about 15hz the DC buss started to get a 100VAC sign wave riding on top of it at ~ 11Hz and linearly increased to 12Hz as the drive was speed up to 20hz, above that the ripple disappeared. The machine vibration also followed starting at 15Hz and disappearing at 20 Hz.

I broke out my Fluke Scope current clamp on, and found the output current waveform to be a normal sine wave below 15hz and above 20Hz.

Between 15 and 20Hz however the Current waveform (on all 3 legs) appears to be the summation of 2 similarly sized ac waveforms.

I discussing the situation with one of our engineers, Steve Lyons, and he suggested that the issue could be the result of the motors rotor wobbling, changing the air gap.

I informed the customer that I'm leaning towards a motor issue ~ 85/15 and that the only way to be certain is to hook up the drive to a test motor.

We will do so at a later date as the customer will bring out his spare motor while he fixes the gearing (he found several issues during a visual inspection preformed while I was dinking with the drive). The machine will be down for a month or so.

I have included a pdf of the "Normal" current waveform VS the "Distorted" current waveform.

I've never seen this before ... if any one has any ideas I'm open for suggestions, experiences, anecdotes...what ever you've got. - DF

Yaskawa V7 data

Yaskawa V7 Trouble Shooting Data

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